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  • The Gold to Sold Group

LABOR YES, BUT NOT IN VAIN



Today we pay homage to the real creator of our nation’s strength, well-being, and prosperity: 

The American Worker!

Labor Day legislation was introduced in numerous local ordinances as far back as 1885 but it would be almost a decade later before, in 1894, President Grover Cleveland would sign a federal law setting aside the first Monday in September to recognize the national labor movement.  In the words of the gentleman who originated the idea to pay tribute to the American workforce: “Today we honor those who, from rude nature, have delved and carved all of the grandeur we now behold.”  Peter J. McGuire, who elegantly spoke these words, was general secretary to the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, and later a co-founder of the American Federation of Labor. 

Street parades were common in observance and celebration of the early 20th century Labor Day festivities. Local festivals were coordinated for the purpose of recreation and amusement of workers and their families. Later, political speeches by prominent officials would become commonplace in order to emphasize and highlight the economic and civic significance of the holiday. 


BOTTOM LINE

The American worker has toiled to create the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known. It is therefore appropriate that the nation would set aside one day to honor their achievements and sacrifices. We hope today finds you resting and enjoying the fruits of your labor! 

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